Tag Archives: classics

Remember Robin Williams with a Crowd at Atlanta’s Plaza Theatre Tribute

The Birdcage, Robin Williams, death, suicide, depression, addiction, gay, homosexual, comedy, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Mike Nichols, Miami, remake, comedy, Plaza Theatre, Film Tribute, Atlanta

The Plaza, 1049 Ponce De Leon Ave, N.E. (404) 873-1939

Fans of Joan Rivers have YouTube to catch clips of the comedienne, who died Thursday at 81. So do Robin Williams lovers — who also have the Oscar winner’s rich movie legacy to enjoy. And in Atlanta, The Plaza Theatre is offering four of the late comic’s movies right now, along with a couple of unrelated classics always worthy of a spot on the marquee: “Pulp Fiction” and “Stop Making Sense.”

I love “The Fisher King,” which I saw just once in its original 1991 release, and “The Birdcage,” which has grown more familiar as a staple of cable TV for the last decade. The Plaza also is showing “Jumanji,” one of Williams’s family pictures, and “Hook,” with an all-star cast directed by Steven Spielberg.

The Birdcage, Robin Williams, death, suicide, depression, addiction, gay, homosexual, comedy, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Mike Nichols, Miami, remake, comedy, Jeff Bridges, The Fisher King, Mercedes RuehlThe Birdcage, Robin Williams, death, suicide, depression, addiction, gay, homosexual, comedy, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Mike Nichols, Miami, remake, comedyMovies are almost always better viewed on the big screen with crowds. And both “The Fisher King” and “The Birdcage” are full-on movies by major directors — gloriously visual and sweepingly emotional. At a time when Williams’s fans are still mourning his recent suicide, what better way to come together and celebrate his genius? YouTube is fine for some things, but only some.

In Atlanta, The Plaza is one of several theaters that regular give us chances to see older movies, and I’m thankful for all of them. Here’s an earlier piece that includes highlights from recent schedules of some around town. I hope we get more heading into the holiday season.

All of the venues, plus Netflix, TMC and Videodrome, helped me catch up on my classics over the summer.  I’m so glad I got to see these, which I hadn’t just a few months ago:

  • “Sullivan’s Travels”
  • “A Face in the Crowd”
  • “The Searchers”
  • “A Hard Day’s Night”
  • “It Happened One Night”
  • “The Best Years of Our Lives”
  • “Touch of Evil”

That’s a good group. My DVR holds a few more, and “The 400 Blows” has arrived from Netflix. So I’m ready for football season.

And a trip or two to The Plaza.


RELATED: Why you must see ‘Life Itself,’ the documentary about Roger Ebert

RELATED: Katniss, ‘The Walking Dead’ drive movie, TV production in Georgia

RELATED: ‘The Lego Movie’ Takes Brand Marketing to New Heights

Follow me on Twitter @JayCroft

Advertisements

Classic-Movie Watch List for Summer: 31 More after ‘Sullivan’s Travels’

Sullivan's Travels, ew.com, top 100 movies, 100 greatest movies, movies, veronica lake, joel mccrae, preston sturges, dvd, video, classics, catching up with classics

Heaven at home: popcorn and “Sullivan’s Travels” ready to go.

Here’s a story that will be a source of pleasure all season and combines three of my favorite things: movies, lists and the young woman who inspired it.

My friend Ellen came home from college and said she wants to catch up on classic movies over the summer. I’d been thinking about doing something similar and pulled up EW.com’s list of the Top 100 All-Time Greatest Movies for reminders and suggestions. Turns out I’ve done OK according to Entertainment Weekly, having seen 68 of these.

But I’d like to at least make a dent in the other 32. I started on Sunday evening, with “Sullivan’s Travels,” a classic Preston Sturges comedy and No. 96 on EW’s list. Short review: LOVED it. It’s about a Hollywood director who decides he needs to find trouble in order to make serious movies, and it’s full of sharp dialog, arresting images, and verbal and visual wit, with two appealing and funny stars, Joel McCrea and Veronica Lake.

So glad I finally made that journey, and I look forward to sharing notes with Ellen as she starts her own adventure. Her father and I grew up at the movies together, and I love that she’s become a cinephile, too. Next up for me: “A Face in the Crowd” with Andy Griffith and Patricia Neal (No. 93).

How about you? What classic movies have you somehow failed to see? Any interest in catching them now? Send me a comment in the link at the top.

RELATED: Why ‘Carrie’ Means So Much

RELATED: ‘The Lego Movie’ Takes Brand Marketing to New Heights

RELATED: Storytelling lessons from Disney